Dolce and Gabbana Watches

This advertisement for Dolce and Gabbana exemplifies Tsai’s arguments about stereotyping gay people. It shows a white man and a woman rushing to meet their respective gay partners in a city. They are physically fit and young, with conventionally beautiful features such as long blond hair for the woman, and a strong jaw line for the man. Their trendy, well- fitting clothes indicate wealth. These features make the pair luxurious and stylish, so their choice in D&G watches defines “high- end tastes and conspicuous consumption” (Tsai 6). This advertisement goes beyond relating D&G with sophistication; it isolates and glorifies one specific lifestyle (young, rich, stylish) that can only be achieved with consumption. According to Tsai, this sophistication exemplifies what D&G wants gay consumers to desire.

The ending kiss between the woman and her identical looking partner reaches out not only to the LGBT community, but also to heterosexual consumers. With such sophistication achieved by a Dolce and Gabbana watch, a man/ woman cannot help but literally fall in love with his or her own image. Even if the ad viewer is not homosexual, the message is clear that the watch instantly achieves sexiness that will attract potential partners. The lesbian pair shares a kiss, and the ad ends with a close up of a watch- clad wrist and breasts. This sexualized image of a lesbian relationship between two attractive women is meant to be “pleasurable even for the heterosexual majority” (Tsai 7).

I think Dolce and Gabbana’s advertisement is targeted to both homosexual and heterosexual consumers because watches are sex- neutral accessories. The company has other similar LGBT targeted TV and print ads. However, by using only white, glamorous actors, the company loses its LGBT “friendliness” and instead grossly stereotypes a diverse group of people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eykYmtmRaxo

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Ad Critique and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

What do you have to say about this?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s