Date Rape Awareness ads

http://www.buzzfeed.com/copyranter/finally-rape-ads-that-put-the-onus-on-the-raper

Today a friend of mine sent me a link to this page highlighting efforts made in the UK to spread awareness about sexual assault. While this is a great step forward in terms of the public view of sexual assault, it’s sad that it’s assumed in western society that these ideas aren’t universal or given. The article references a poster from the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board that “puts the blame squarely on drunk women”. All of this ties into the idea of women being sexual objects for the taking, especially when alcohol is involved. The article cites a study that claimed that “48% of men didn’t consider it rape if a woman is too drunk to know what was going on.” As someone involved with spreading sexual assault awareness on campus (through 1in4), it’s heartening to see campaigns like this in the world. However, the fact that they’re even necessary truly shows how many people are sorely misinformed on the issue and prone to victim blaming. With any luck, we’ll start seeing these in the US in the near future.

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One Response to Date Rape Awareness ads

  1. dmarryshow says:

    “Victim Blaming” is I think more complex than we in gender studies give it credit for. I completely agree that there is an emphasis on teaching women not to get raped rather than teaching men that rape is unacceptable. The fact that we in society place so much responsibility for assault on the victim is 100% based on stereotypes that we have about the nature of men and women (i.e., men are sexually insatiable, cannot control their sexual urges, and must be accommodated vs. women are vulnerable and should be wary of this “truth” about men). However, I do believe that advertisements that tell women to control their intake of alcohol, stay with a buddy, or be aware of their surroundings are helpful to women and help them defend against rape culture. I think this can be interpreted as a case in which stereotypes may end up giving victims of those stereotypes some agency (i.e. the G.I.D. allows trans people to access health services despite the fact that the principle is insulting).

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